Employees with hybrid working arrangements were slightly more positive onmost questions than those working exclusively at home or on site.A small but consistent pattern emerged between employees with different workingarrangements. Those who split their time between home and on-site were slightly morepositive on average across most questions, followed by those working primarily fromhome. Employees who were working primarily on site at the time of the Survey tendedto be the least positive.The largest difference was seen on employees feeling valued for their individualcontribution. Among those who split their time between home and onsite, 92% feltvalued; among those who worked primarily onsite, 80%. Employees working primarilyon-site were also less likely to feel listened to when they spoke up about an issue; justunder seven in ten said that this was the case, compared with eight in ten of those whosplit their time between on-site and home.FSSC research6 suggests that half of financial services employees want to work moreflexibly post pandemic. The future of the workplace is a topic explored by the FSCB inquantitative and qualitative research in both 2020 and 2021.

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