Asian/Asian British employees were the most likely to worry about the negativeconsequences of speaking up, while Black/Black British employees were themost positive on the question related to feeling listened to when speaking up.Black/Black British employees were more positive than employees of any otherethnicity on the question related to feeling listened to when speaking up about issueswith only 6% disagreeing.In contrast, 24% of Asian/Asian British employees said that they did not feel listenedto. Moreover, 34% of Asian/Asian British employees said they would worry about thenegative consequences of raising a concern, falling to 15% among White employees.

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